Speakers

FRIENDS now has volunteer speakers who can provide an interesting topic for your group’s next gathering for as little as $50 + mileage! Speaker’s fees are donated directly to FRIENDS to assist in the endeavors of the Wisconsin Historical Society.

Our list of topics currently include:

 

SHEEP TO SHAWL

From the shearing of the sheep to your finished knitted shawl, this talk goes into detail on processing wool, including topics such as quality of the fleece from different kinds of sheep, cleaning, carding, and spinning your wool into yarn. For more information, contact Kathleen Krause at kknewf@aol.com or 262-495-4373.

 

TEA-LEAF, MOSS ROSE & WHITE IRONSTONE CHINA

Examples of the china are displayed and examined, interspersed with interesting tidbits about life in the mid-1800s. Presented by Riene Wells, charter member of the Tea Leaf Club International and owner of a 2000+ piece collection that has been displayed at the Wisconsin Antique Dealers’ “Special Attraction” booth. Riene is a frequent speaker at various historical group gatherings. For more information, contact info@eagle-house.com.

 

THE VICTORIANS & THE INFLUENCE OF THEIR DOGS

View examples from “not your usual dog collection” as Kathleen informs of the importance of the dog in the Victorian home, both as a helper and a companion.  Hear many interesting stories and see several unusual items celebrating dogs.   The informative talk features the Newfoundland dog.  Newfoundlands were owned by many famous people including Charles Dickens, Lord Byron, and President U.S. Grant. The presenter is Kathleen Krause, FRIENDS of Wisconsin Historical Society Board Member, who has an extensive collection of Victorian dog items, that have been featured in “Collectable and Flea Market Finds” magazine. Kathleen has raised and shown dogs for over 35 years. For more information, contact kknewf@aol.com or 262-495-4373.

 

WHALING HISTORY & THE WHALER’S ART: SCRIMSHAW

Scrimshaw is a 19th-century American sailor-made art form created primarily (but not exclusively) from the teeth bone of harvested whales during the heyday of the American whaling industry. Learn about this industry that was so important to America’s success and study examples of the art form created by sailors during their seemingly-endless trips at sea. Tom L. & Barb Conley are members of the New Bedford Whaling Museum and are annual presenters at the Scrimshaw Collectors’ Symposium. For more information, contact BarbConley1@sbcglobal.net or  847-669-5391.

 

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